Skip to main content

About your Search

20121001
20121009
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3
, it is not necessarily in the exact timing or form that the current law baseline looks out right now, but sticking with the essential elements. those of you who know me know that i am quite fond of the current law baseline. in the past i have said what we need to do is to follow a strict pay-as-you-go. i am tired of exempting this and ignoring that. let's stick to strict pay-as- you-go. pay-go noit to exceptions. i will just modify that today and say instead of pay-ago, is re-go. recycle as you go. set targets that congress says, by this date, we will have achieved this goal. the budget committees and the budget process to enforce this. there is something called budget conciliates -- reconciliation where they've direct the budget and other entities with jurisdiction over the program to come up with reforms, for spending targets. the announcement we need is what tells us whether we want to use this can like this, or do we melt it down and reshape its four different parts of the whole system. if we want to give tax cuts low, we need to broaden the base. and what are some different trade-offs? how mu
that the university of michigan law school, where they did use race in admission, had a lower level of -- they considered 14% to be a critical mass, much less than what the university of texas achieved through race-neutral means. i think this goes a long way to explaining why most observers think the supreme court is likely to strike down the use of race at the university of texas. the second question we take up, what should replace race-based affirmative action if it in fact is struck down by the u.s. supreme court? in a report, we look at nine states where, because of voter initiative or executive order or legislation, universities -- they did not give up on diversity and tried to find other ways of achieving racial and ethnic diversity. these plans were hardly perfect, but in many ways there are better than the old style of race-based affirmative action. you can see that in our analysis, six state street -- six states created partnerships with disadvantaged by schools to increase the pipeline of low- income and minority students. seven of the states provide class-based admission
lawsuits pending that could negate some of the new laws that are intended to require photo ids for voters? >> first observation is, in terms of the case in maryland, that was one misguided example. never should have happened. the race was not that close. it was a huge mistake by that individual and he paid for it with a time in prison. in terms of your concerns about voter i.d., and having to show id, i live in virginia and just got my voter card. they allow any kind of thing, a utility bill, or anything like that. it is a lot easier to vote then to get on an airplane. if you are worried about fraud, i think that these are reasonable requirements. >> in terms of polling, to the extent that both firms can, we try to pull a registered voter list. registered voters who have presumably -- i mean, we try to sample who have not only registered -- people who have not only registered but voted in the last election. >> in a lot of states, they have to have a photo id. how do you account for that? >> our callers asked you to show them your folder id -- your photo i.d. >> not a lot that you can do.
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3